Monday, 27 July 2009

More Thoughts on Archbishop Rowan's Reflections on Our Anglican Future

These are some of his thoughts on how our future might play out:
23. …perhaps we are faced with the possibility rather of a 'two-track' model, two ways of witnessing to the Anglican heritage, one of which had decided that local autonomy had to be the prevailing value and so had in good faith declined a covenantal structure. If those who elect this model do not take official roles in the ecumenical interchanges and processes in which the 'covenanted' body participates, this is simply because within these processes there has to be clarity about who has the authority to speak for whom.

24. It helps to be clear about these possible futures, however much we think them less than ideal, and to speak about them not in apocalyptic terms of schism and excommunication but plainly as what they are – two styles of being Anglican, whose mutual relation will certainly need working out but which would not exclude co-operation in mission and service of the kind now shared in the Communion. It should not need to be said that a competitive hostility between the two would be one of the worst possible outcomes, and needs to be clearly repudiated. The ideal is that both 'tracks' should be able to pursue what they believe God is calling them to be as Church, with greater integrity and consistency. It is right to hope for and work for the best kinds of shared networks and institutions of common interest that could be maintained as between different visions of the Anglican heritage. And if the prospect of greater structural distance is unwelcome, we must look seriously at what might yet make it less likely.
For me, the problem goes beyond mere "styles of being Anglican." We need to be talking about the same Jesus and the same, authoritative, Holy Scriptures. I'm not sure how much I can co-operate in mission with someone who's mission is to assure people that there is no need to try and live according to Biblical teaching or for saving faith in Jesus Christ. There is a point where two tracks have to become separate.
The Archbishop continues:
25. It is my strong hope that all the provinces will respond favourably to the invitation to Covenant. But in the current context, the question is becoming more sharply defined of whether, if a province declines such an invitation, any elements within it will be free (granted the explicit provision that the Covenant does not purport to alter the Constitution or internal polity of any province) to adopt the Covenant as a sign of their wish to act in a certain level of mutuality with other parts of the Communion. It is important that there should be a clear answer to this question.
Important, indeed. If the Anglican Church of Canada decides to follow The Episcopal Church's lead at next year's General Synod, I'd like to know that my parish will be free to adopt that Covenant.